Celebrities

The Brian Gay Invitational draws an all-star list of celebrities for a spectacular weekend of fun and generosity for an extremely worthwhile cause. In 2013, participants and celebrities enjoyed getting to know each other and going head-to-head in some friendly competition on the course.

Brian Gay

Born an only child in a military family, Brian Gay was raised in Fort Rucker, Alabama where he spent much of his early years on the golf course with his father and other military retirees.

As a young golfer, childhood aspirations quickly developed into early success and earned Brian Gay an athletic scholarship to the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL. A proud Gator golfer, Brian contributed to numerous team victories including four consecutive Southeastern Conference (SEC) championships from 1991 – 1994, as well as the 1993 NCAA Division I Men's Golf Championships.

Brian’s personal collegiate accolades include 1991 SEC Freshman of the Year, five-time individual medalist, three-time first-team All-SEC selection from 1992–1994, two-time All-American in 1992 and1993, and the only two-time SEC individual champion in 1992 and 1994. In 2010, Brian was inducted into the University of Florida Athletic Hall of Fame.

Upon leaving college in 1994, Brian launched his career as a professional golfer and joined the PGA Tour in 1999. Throughout his 19 year career he has won four PGA Tournaments including Mayakoba OHL Classic at Riviera Maya – Cancun in 2008, RBC Heritage in 2009 and Fed Ex St. Jude Classic in 2009. Most recently, on January 21, 2013, Brian won the Humana Challenge (formally, the historical Bob Hope Classic) in La Quinta, California. His victory at the Humana Challenge earned Brian the PGA Tour Player of the Month for January 2013, as voted for by the fans, edging out competitors Tiger Woods, Dustin Johnson and Russell Henley.

Following his PGA Tour success in 2009, Sports Illustrated Players Championship Issue featured a cover story on Brian, revealing him as the ultimate family man who depends on the strong support and encouragement from his wife, Kimberly and two daughters, Makinley and Brantley, while playing the PGA Tour. Additionally in 2010, Brian was on the April cover of Golf Week featuring a four page story highlighting his journey to the Masters.

With a passion for giving back, Brian values social responsibility and contributes to the community by donating his time and resources to various charities throughout the year including Birdies for the Brave, K9 For Warriors, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and inner-city golf programs in Orlando, FL. He is a Gold Sponsor to the Bridges of Light, a contributor to the Golf for Wounded Warriors Project Tournament, and was chosen to represent Team Arnold Palmer Hospital. Additionally, his involvement in the PGA Tour Wives Association helps support children's charities across the United States.

Art Smith

Art Smith

Chef Art Smith loves the idea of bringing people together through food. It’s partly what made him the success he is today. He is the executive chef and co-owner of Table fifty-two, Art and Soul, Southern Art and Bourbon Bar, and LYFE Kitchen restaurants. MORE 

Art Smith has received the culinary profession’s highest awards and has cooked for some of the world’s most famous celebrities. In 1997, Smith became the personal, day-to-day chef to Oprah Winfrey, a position that lasted ten years. Smith now coordinates and cooks for special events all around the world.

Most recently Smith has made several television appearances including ABC’s Lady Gaga Thanksgiving Special, Top Chef, Top Chef Duels, and returned to Top Chef Masters (for the second time), where he quickly became an audience favorite. Smith was also featured in an episode of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition where he lent a hand to a deserving family that has devoted their lives to providing meals for the less fortunate members of their community.

Smith is the author of four award-winning cookbooks: Back to the Table; Kitchen Life: Real Food for Real Families; and Back to the Family. He contributed recipes and cooking advice to The Spectrum, the newest book by ground-breaking cardiologist and New York Times bestselling author Dr. Dean Ornish. In May of 2013 his latest cookbook was released, Art Smith’s Healthy Comfort, with a focus on healthy cooking and healthy living, (published by Harper One 2013).

Smith is the founder of Common Threads, a nonprofit organization teaching low-income children to cook wholesome and affordable meals since 2003. He believes that through hands-on cooking and introducing children to fresh foods we can help prevent childhood obesity, reverse the trend of poor eating habits, and learn about diversity and tolerance through the celebration of our cultural differences and our commonalities.

Marcus Allen

Marcus Allen

Marcus Allen received numerous honors during his illustrious 15 year career in the National Football League (NFL). As a running back, Allen ran for 12,243 yards and caught 587 passes for 5,412 yards. He scored 145 touchdowns, including a then-league record, 123 rushing touchdowns. MORE 

He was voted the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year, was elected to six Pro Bowls and was the first player ever to gain more than 10,000 rushing yards and 5,000 receiving yards. Allen was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2000 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003 and is considered one of the greatest goal line and short-yard runners in NFL history. Allen joined an elite group of players to win both the Heisman Trophy and Super Bowl MVP, he was named the NFL Comeback Player of the Year, and during his tenure in Kansas City, the Chiefs won more games than any other NFL team.

Allen may be best remembered for his heroics in Super Bowl XVIII January 22, 1984 as he ran for 191 yards, caught two passes for 18 yards, and scored two touchdowns in the Raiders 38-9 victory over the Washington Redskins. Included in his game stats was a 74-yard touchdown run, a feat that remained the longest run in Super Bowl history until Super Bowl XL. Allen retired after the 1997 season and in 1999, he was ranked 72nd on The Sporting News’ list of the 100 Greatest Football Players.

Jose Alvarez

Jose Alvarez

Jose Alvarez was 25 years old when he broke into Major League Baseball as a pitcher with the Atlanta Braves. He played four seasons at the major league level, pitching for the Braves in 1981 and 1982 and then again in 1988 and 1989. MORE 

Alvarez played his first professional season with the Braves’ Rookie league Kingsport Braves in 1978, and his last with their Triple-A club, the Richmond Braves, in 1995. He currently resides in Greenville, SC. He is on staff with the Fellowship of Christian Athletes serving as Chaplain on the PGA’s Nationwide Tour.

Alvarez is a member of LifeAthletes and has coached youth baseball and high school baseball in Greenville, SC. He routinely speaks at FamilyLife marriage conferences around the country called “Weekend to Remember” with his wife Michelle.

Tommy Armour III

Tommy Armour III

Tommy Armour III inherited his love of golf from his grandfather, “The Silver Scot,” who won the 1927 U.S. Open, 1930 PGA Championship and 1931 Open Championship and is a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame. Armour III first joined the PGA Tour at the age of 21 and to date has two career PGA Tour victories, winning the 1990 Phoenix Open and the 2003 Valero Texas Open. Armour III currently holds the scoring record for best overall 72 hole score (254), which he set with his Valero Texas Open victory in 2003. MORE 

Armour III was the first repeat champion at the Callaway Golf Pebble Beach Invitational. He made his Champions Tour debut at The ACE Group Classic in February 2010. In 2011, despite his Champions Tour status, Armour III decided to go to PGA Tour Q School. At 52, he was the oldest player in the field.

Roger Clemens

Roger Clemens

The Rocket Roger Clemens played 24 seasons in Major League Baseball, pitching for four teams, the Boston Red Sox, Toronto Blue Jays, New York Yankees and Houston Astros. Clemens was one of the most dominant pitchers in major league history, tallying 354 wins, a 3.12 earned run average (ERA), and the third-most strikeouts of all time - 4,672. An 11-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, he won seven Cy Young Awards during his career, the most of any pitcher in history. Clemens was known for his fierce competitive nature and hard-throwing pitching style, which he used to intimidate batters, earning him the nickname “The Rocket”. MORE 

Clemens was the anchor of the Boston Red Sox pitching staff for 12 years. In 1986, he struck out an MLB-record 20 batters in a single game. After the 1996 season, Clemens left Boston and joined the Toronto Blue Jays, pitching the triple crown by leading the league in wins, ERA, and strikeouts. Prior to the 1999 season, Clemens was traded to the New York Yankees where he won his only two World Series titles. In 2003, he reached his 300th win and 4,000th strikeout in the same game. Clemens left for the Houston Astros in 2004, where he spent three seasons and won his seventh Cy Young Award. He rejoined the Yankees in 2007 for one last season before retiring.

John Cook

John Cook

John Cook grew up on the golf course as the son of a PGA Tour official. Cook was offered a scholarship to the Ohio State University, and was personally advised to accept by Jack Nicklaus and Tom Weiskopf. Cook was a member of the Buckeyes’ 1979 NCAA Championship team, he won the U.S. Amateur in 1978 at age 20, and nearly won it again in 1979, losing in the finals. MORE 

He joined the PGA Tour in 1980 and throughout his very successful career has won eleven PGA Tour events and nine Champions Tour events. His first victory on the PGA Tour came in 1981 at the Bing Crosby National Pro-Am in Pebble Beach, CA. As his career took off, Cook was awarded the PGA Tour Comeback Player of the Year in 1992. His eleventh and final PGA Tour win came in 2001, at the Reno-Tahoe Open, at the age of 43. In October 2007, Cook joined the Champions Tour and won the AT&T Championship in San Antonio two years in a row.

Johnny Damon

Johnny Damon

MLB star for 18 seasons, Johnny Damon is one of the most outstanding, respected and durable players in MLB. Damon has played with the Kansas City Royals, Oakland A’s, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Detroit Tigers, Tampa Bay Rays and Cleveland Indians. After winning the 2004 World Series with the Boston Red Sox and achieving legendary superstar status in New England, Damon signed with the New York Yankees in 2006. In 2009, he won a World Series with the Yankees, joining Babe Ruth, to be one of just a few full-time players to achieve World Series rings with both the Red Sox and Yankees. MORE 

Damon is that unique star athlete who has remained truly humble in the face of overwhelming popularity He also has that rare free spirit, enabling him to leverage his all-star performance over the past decade to become one of the most recognizable and popular players in MLB.

Robert Damron

Robert Damron

PGA Tour Player, Robert Damron, was raised in Orlando, Florida, where he had the benefit of some early golf advice from his neighbor, Arnold Palmer. MORE 

Damron attended the University of Central Florida in Orlando where he was a distinguished member of the golf team, earning All-American honors three times and setting the school record for the most wins in school history with five. Damron won the prestigious invitation-only John Hancock All-American Tournament and the Sun Belt Conference Tournament as a freshman. He also helped the team to two NCAA Regional berths and competed at the Regional as an individual the third year. He holds the school 54-hole scoring record and is second in career scoring average.

Damron turned pro in 1994, becoming the first UCF student to earn a full-time berth on the PGA Tour. He was inducted into the UCF Athletics Hall of Fame in 2002.

Damron has won one PGA Tour event, the 2001 Verizon Byron Nelson Classic. He finished in a three-way tie for first in the same tournament in 2004. His best finish in a major is a T-20 at the 2003 U.S. Open.

Richard Dent

Richard Dent

Richard Dent was elected into the National Football League (NFL) hall of fame in 2011 after a spectacular career with numerous accomplishments including being named as Super Bowl XX Most Valuable Player. Dent was a dominant pass-rushing force during his time as an NFL defensive end. An eighth-round draft pick for the Chicago Bears in 1983, Dent played in every game as a rookie. As a starter in the final 10 games of his second season, he recorded 17.5 sacks, the most of any defender in the National Football Conference (NFC) and shattering the current team record. MORE 

For Dent, the 1984 season was the beginning of a remarkable 10- year period during which he recorded 10 or more sacks in eight of the next ten seasons including five consecutive seasons. In fact, his NFC leading 17.5 sacks in 1984 was immediately followed up with an NFL best 17 sacks in 1985. In Super Bowl XX, Dent’s Super Bowl performance – three tackles, 1.5 sacks, and two forced fumbles – earned him the MVP honors.

At the time of his retirement, Dent’s stunning 137.5 career sack total was At the time of his retirement, Dent’s stunning career sack total was 137.5! He was named first- or second-team All- Pro four times in his career, named to the All-NFC team five times and selected to play in four Pro Bowls. In addition to his career as a Chicago Bear, Dent also made contributions as a San Francisco 49er (1994), and Indianapolis Colt (1996) and a Philadelphia Eagle (1997).

Eric Dickerson

Eric Dickerson

Eric Dickerson wasselected second overall in the 1983 National Football League Draft by the Los Angeles Rams. An immediate success, he established rookie records for most rushing attempts, most rushing yards gained and most touchdowns rushing. MORE 

In his second season, Dickerson continued his onslaught on the NFL record book becoming a member of the 2,000 rushing yards club. Twelve times in 1984 he gained more than 100 yards rushing, breaking the record held by O.J. Simpson. No one has since rushed for more yards in a single NFL season.

By 1989, Dickerson had set a new NFL record with seven straight seasons of more than 1,000 yards rushing, and led the league for four of those seasons.

Dickerson retired from the NFL as the 2nd leading rusher of all-time and in 1999 he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Mike Eurizone

Mike Eruzione

Not everyone gets to see the highlights of their sports career replayed on the big screen, but Olympic hockey legend, Mike Eruzione, can claim such honors. MORE 

Eruzione served as the enthusiastic captian that led the 1980 U.S. Olympic Hockey Team to its Gold Medal victory against the Soviet Union in the Game that Stunned the World.

Walt Disney adapted the story of the “Miracle on Ice” into a feature length film, titled Miracle, which was released in February 2004.

After graduating from Boston University, Eruzione joined the U.S. National Team and was chosen to be a member of the infamous 1980 U.S. Olympic Team at left wing and held the honor of being elected captain by his teammates, as well as being inducted into Olympic Hall of Fame.

In the years since the spectacular Olympic victory, Eruzione spent several years as a commentator, both for the Madison Square Garden Communications Network and broadcasting for Olympic hockey games. Recetly, he has traveled throughout the United States for major corporations and organizations as a motivational speaker and sports promoter. He is the director of alumni programs at Boston University and remains actively involved in fund raising events for the U.S. Olympic Committee as well as many charities and youth programs.

George Gervin

George Gervin

“The Iceman”, played in both the American Basketball Association (ABA) and the National Basketball Association (NBA) and is counted as one of the greatest shooting guards in NBA history. MORE 

During his career with the Virginia Squires, San Antonio Spurs and Chicago Bulls, Gervin earned his nickname “The Iceman” for his cool demeanor on the court. He completed his playing career with an average of 26.2 points per game, leading the NBA in scoring average for four years (1978, 1979, 1980 and 1982). In fact, prior to Michael Jordan, The Iceman had the most scoring titles of any guard in the history of the NBA.

Perhaps what Gervin is most known for is “the finger roll”. It was his trademark move and really opened the door to a whole new style of shooting in basketball. His technique of rolling the basketball along his fingertips has been mimicked by many when shooting layups, but none to the perfection of The Iceman himself, who was known to finger roll from as far away as the free throw line.

After retirement from the NBA, Gervin played for several years in Europe before being inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1996. His number 44 jersey has been retired by the San Antonio Spurs and he is honored as one of the 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History, selected by a panel of media members, players, coaches, and general managers.

Troy Glaus

Troy Glaus

Troy Glaus played first and third base in Major League Baseball for 13 seasons. He hit 320 home runs and 950 RBI in 1,537 games. He was selected to four All-Star Games, three with the Angels and one with the Blue Jays. His breakout season came in 2000, when he became the all-time single season home run leader for third basemen in Angels’ history with 47 home runs. MORE 

In 2002 Glaus was selected as the World Series MVP, as his team came back to win the World Series following a 6-14 start, bringing the trophy to Anaheim for the first time in 42 seasons.

When he came up in the eighth inning of Game 6 his two-run double off Robb Nen sent the Angels on to a 6-5 win and gave them life when they could have been going home. Glaus who hit .385 with three homers and eight RBIs in the Series, was the easy choice as World Series MVP.

John Hart

John Hart

In October 2014, John Hart, was named President of Baseball Operations for the Atlanta Braves. A senior team executive for over 20 years, John has consistently demonstrated the ability to construct winning baseball teams. MORE 

As General Manager and Executive Vice President of the Cleveland Indians, he built a club that won six American League Division titles and reached the World Series twice. In 1994 and 1995, Hart was named Sporting News’ Major League Executive of the Year. He was also senior advisor for the Texas Rangers during 2010-11 when the club reached the World Series.

John has been in the game since 1969 as a players, later managing the Minor leagues and coaching in the majors. In recent years he has appeared on MLB Network as a commentator on MLB Tonight and Hot Stove.

grant hill

Grant Hill

After graduating from Duke, Grant Hill was the number one pick by the Detroit Pistons in the 1994 NBA draft. The co-NBA Rookie of the Year, he was also a member of gold medal winning Dream Team, representing Team USA at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta. A gifted all-around player, Hill finished his career as one of 17 players in NBA history with over 17,000 points, 6,000 rebounds, and 4,000 assists. He played in 1,026 total NBA games in his career. MORE 

The leadership Hill brought to his teams, both on and off the court was immeasurable. Hill was given the 2004-05 NBA Sportsmanship Award (Joe Dumars Trophy) for his “sportsmanship, ethical behavior, fair play and integrity” on and off the court.

During the 2011-2012 season, The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame announced that Hill was named the winner of the highly prestigious Mannie Jackson - Basketball’s Human Spirit Award. The criteria for award winners includes embracing the core values of the game through hard work, dedication, and resilience; striving to continuously improve the community they serve, and making an ongoing commitment to others. Hill’s contributions in charity work, academic scholarships, and national initiatives for healthier lifestyles, demonstrates his servant heart towards the people in his community.

Though officially retired from the league, Hill’s overall contributions to the game of basketball continue to be recognized.

J.B. Holmes

J.B. Holmes

Illustrious PGA Tour Player, J.B. Holmes is known for his compact swing and long drives. Holmes began his golf career early on, playing on the varsity golf team at Taylor County High School when he was just in the third grade, and was in the top two on the team by fifth grade. MORE 

In high school, he played on the Pepsi Junior Golf Tour and won the Kentucky High School title as a sophomore. Holmes continued on to the University of Kentucky where he helped to win the SEC Title and represented the United States in the 2005 Walker Cup.

In 2005, Holmes qualified for the PGA Tour and tied for tenth in his Tour start. A year later, in only his fifth tournament as a professional, he won the FBR Open, making him the fastest golfer on the PGA Tour to reach $1,000,000 in career earnings. Recently, Holmes secured his third PGA Tour win at the 2014 Wells Fargo Championship.

Reggie Jackson

Reggie Jackson

Reggie Jackson is a former right fielder who played 21 seasons in Major League Baseball for five different teams Kansas City / Oakland Athletics (1967–1975, 1987), Baltimore Orioles (1976), New York Yankees (1977–1981), and California Angels (1982–1986). He was nicknamed “Mr. October” for his clutch hitting in the postseason with the Oakland A’s and the New York Yankees. MORE 

Jackson won three consecutive World Series titles as a member of the Oakland Athletics and three American League pennants and two consecutive World Series titles with the Yankees. He is perhaps best remembered for hitting three consecutive home runs in the clinching game of the 1977 World Series.

Jackson was a 14-time All-Star and five-time World Series champion; he won two Silver Slugger Awards, the 1973 American League MVP Award, two World Series MVP Awards and the 1977 Babe Ruth Award. Jackson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1993.The Athletics and Yankees both retired his uniform number.

Jackson currently serves as a special advisor to the Yankees, and has founded the Mr. October Foundation for Kids, which focuses on “enabling students of underrepresented minorities to thrive in a world that is driven by science, technology and innovation.”

Davey Johnson

Davey Johnson

Retired Major League Baseball (MLB) player and manager, Davey Johnson, won an amazing three world-series championships; two as a player and one as a manager. As a player, Johnson was the starting second baseman for the Orioles when they won four American League pennants and two World Series championships between 1965 and 1972. He made four All-Star Game appearances and received the Rawlings Gold Glove Award three times. MORE 

After transitioning from an MLB player to an MLB manger, Johnson’s accomplishments continued. The teams he piloted in the three years from 1995 to 1997 all made it to their respective League Championship Series – the Cincinnati Reds in 1995 and the Orioles in both 1996 and 1997. Johnson reached his biggest management success when he led the Mets to the 1986 World Series title, earning him his third world-series ring.

In 1997, Johnson won the American League’s Manager of the Year Award and then won the same award in the National League in 2012 when he led the Nationals to the franchise’s first division title since 1981.

Johnson retired as a manager after the 2013 season, but remains active with the Washington Nationals organization as a consultant.

Ray Lankford

Ray Lankford

Ray Lankford is a retired Major League Baseball center fielder who played for the St. Louis Cardinals and San Diego Padres from 1990 to 2004. He was known for his combination of power, speed, and defensive prowess. He posted one of the longest and most distinguished careers in the history of Cardinals baseball. MORE 

Lankford made his major league debut with St. Louis in 1990 and in 1991,his first full season he led the league with 15 triples, 44 stolen bases, and scored 83 runs, earning him a third place finish in the Rookie of the Year voting. He also accomplished the rare feat of hitting for the cycle, becoming the first Cardinal rookie ever to do so. He posted five seasons of 20 home runs and 20 stolen bases wit the Cardinals (1992, 1995-1998), making him the only player in franchise history to accomplish the feat more than once. He was selected as the starting center fielder for the National League (NL) in the 1997 All-Star Game.

Lankford finished his career among the Cardinal Top 10 in numerous statistical categories, including home runs (third), stolen bases (fifth), runs scored (eighth), runs batted in (eighth) and bases on balls (fourth). Lankford hit more home runs at Busch Stadium (123) than any other player and finished his career in his home ballpark with a pinch hit home run in his final major league at bat on October 3, 2004. He is the only player to have 200 home runs and 200 stolen bases as a Cardinal.

Ryan Longwell

Ryan Longwell

Ryan Longwell is a retired National Football League placekicker. After playing college football for the University of California, Berkeley, he started his professional football career with the San Francisco 49ers and later enjoyed two long stints with the Green Bay Packers from 1997 to 2005 and the Minnesota Vikings from 2006 to 2011. MORE 

Longwell is best remembered for his performance with the Minnesota Vikings that was one of the best of his career. He was responsible for all 16 of the Vikings points in a 16-13 win over the Carolina Panthers, kicking three field goals (including the game winning field goal in overtime) and throwing a 16-yard touchdown pass on a fake field goal play in the fourth quarter. In the 2008 season finale against the New York Giants, he kicked a 50-yard field goal with no time left to help the Vikings clinch the division win in a 20-19 victory.

Joe Magrane

Joe Magrane

Retired Major League pitcher Joe Magrane is an MLB network analyst, regularly appearing on MLB Tonight, Hot Stove, Diamond Demo and MLB Network’s special event coverage. MORE 

A 1985 All-American selection at the University of Arizona, Magrane enjoyed a 10-year Major League career, compiling a 56-67 record and 3.81 ERA with the Cardinals (1987-93), Angels (1993-95), and White Sox (1996). Magrane finished third in National League Rookie of the Year voting in 1987, en route to a Cardinals pennant. He won the National League ERA title in 1988 and won 18 games in 1989, placing third in the National League Cy Young Award voting, with an 18-9 win-loss record, a 2.91 ERA and only 5 home runs surrendered in 234⅔ innings.

Kevin Millar

Kevin Millar

For 11 seasons, Kevin Millar brought his unique brand of contagious energy and blue-collar baseball to players and fans of 5 different MLB franchises. Millar has rarely been short for words and he is well known for making ”Cowboy Up” a rallying cry for teams everywhere with their backs against the wall. In 2004 it was Kevin who’s ninth inning lead-off walk against Yankee’s closer Mariano Rivera opened the door for what has become known as the greatest comeback in all of Boston sports history. David Roberts was put in to pinch run for Millar and with David’s steal, a totally improbable comeback World Series winning run had begun. That scene was later immortalized in the 2005 comedy Fever Pitch with Drew Barrymore and Jimmy Fallon. MORE 

Millar’s self-described “knucklehead” antics have made him a favorite around the League with not only teammates and fans, but it made him the “go-to-guy” and media as well. Following the 2001 season, Millar was presented with the Charlie Hough Good Guy Award from the Florida chapter of the BBWAA. Likewise, following the 2003 season, Millar received the Jackie Jensen Award from the notoriously stolid Boston chapter of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America.

Millar is currently a broadcaster, analyst and television personality on the MLB Network. As a co-Host of “Intentional Talk” with Chris Rose, Millar has taken his new catch phrase “Got Heeem!” mainstream.

David Mobley

David Mobley

David Mobley has become known as “Golf’s Long Drive Expert”, is a two- time RE/MAX World Long Drive Champion (2004 Open, 2011 Senior) and the owner/host of The Golf Mob Radio Show. At the 2011 RE/MAX World Long Drive Championships, Mobley obliterated the former grid record with an astounding blast of 459 yards! MORE 

In addition to being named the 2004 & 2011 RE/MAX World Long Drive Champion, Mobley has been ranked #1 in the world by Long Drivers of America in 2003-2005, a 20-time RE/MAX World Long Drive Championship Finalist, the winner of more than 20 professional Long Drive events and a member of the winning USA Long Drive Teams from 2000-2009.

Mobley’s top club head speed has been clocked at 137 mph and ball speed at over 200 mph.

Phil Nevin

Phil Nevin

Phil Nevin spent twelve seasons playing Major League Baseball. In his college career, Nevin led his team to the championship game in the 1992 College World Series (CWS), after which he was named the CWS Most Outstanding Player and won the Golden Spikes Award. Chosen with the first-overall pick in the 1992 Major League Baseball Draft, Nevin went on to play in MLB for seven teams across 12 seasons. He was selected to appear in the 2001 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

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After retiring, Nevin stayed involved in baseball. He briefly went into broadcasting, then managed the unaffiliated Orange County Flyers for a season. He managed the Class AA Erie SeaWolves and the Class AAA Toledo Mud Hens in the Tigers organization until August 2013. Nevin currently manages the Reno Aces, the Diamondbacks’ Class AAA minor league affiliate.

Bud Norris

Bud Norris

Bud Norris is a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball currently for the Baltimore Orioles. MORE 

Norris was selected in the sixth round (189th overall) of the 2006 Major League Baseball Draft by the Houston Astros. Baseball America ranked him as the number two prospect in the Astros’ organization. In August 2009 he was named the Pacific Coast League Pitcher of the Year, after leading the league with a 2.63 earned run average.

Norris received his first major league start on August 2, 2009, where he took a no-hitter into the sixth inning and pitched seven shutout innings against the St. Louis Cardinals to earn his first career victory. In his rookie season overall, Norris went 6–3 with a 4.53 ERA in ten starts.

Norris was traded to the Baltimore Orioles in July 2013, where he continues his notable pitching career

Nick O'Hern

Nick O'Hern

Australian professional golfer, Nick O’Hern, has played on both of the world’s premier professional golf tours, the European Tour, and the United States based PGA Tour. MORE 

O’Hern took up golf at the age of nine and turned professional in 1994. He was successful at the European Tour qualifying school at his first attempt in 1998 and played regularly on the European Tour from 1999 through 2007.

In 2005 O’Hern began to play quite regularly in the United States. Not yet a member of the PGA Tour, but having reached the top twenty of the Official World Golf Rankings, he received a substantial number of invitations for PGA Tour events. In 2006 he became a member of the PGA Tour and has since played mostly on the U.S. PGA tour.

In 2006, O’Hern won the Australian PGA Championship, and the win propelled him to the top of the PGA Tour of Australasia’s Order of Merit for 2006. He has won a total of five tournaments in Australia, and continues to play on the both sides of the hemisphere! O’Hern has been featured in the top 20 of the Official World Golf Rankings and he is the only player who has beaten Tiger Woods in match play more than once.

Bo Outlaw

Bo Outlaw

Bo Outlaw spent 13 seasons in the National Basketball Association (NBA), playing for the Los Angeles Clippers (1994-1997), the Orlando Magic (1997-2001 & 2005-2007), the Phoenix Suns (2002-2003 & 2004) and the Memphis Grizzlies (2003). During his time in the league, Outlaw was known for his athleticism and tenacious defensive skills. In his NBA debut game, he scored 13 points and snagged 7 rebounds. MORE 

In his 1997-98 season, he started in 76 of 82 regular season games and recorded what would remain career-high averages in every statistical category except for assists. On April 17, 1998, Outlaw made the record books with his first triple-double, recording 25 points, 13 rebounds, and 10 assists. After the game, reporters asked him how he felt about his first triple-double, to which Outlaw famously replied “What’s that, some kind of hamburger?”

Outlaw was also recognized for his outstanding work in the Central Florida community winning the Rich and Helen DeVos Community Enrichment Award three times (1998-99, 2005-06, 2006-07), becoming one of only two players in team history to accomplish that feat. Outlaw currently serves as a Community Ambassador for the Orlando Magic, striving to make a positive impact in the community and on today’s youth by speaking to local Orlando youth groups and participating in basketball clinics and camps.

Carl Paulson

Carl Paulson

Carl Paulson first picked up a club when he was 10 years old out on the course with his father one Saturday morning. That first swing led to lessons, state champion titles in high school, the honor of SEC Player of the Year in college and eventually a spot on the PGA Tour at the age of 23. MORE 

After four years on the PGA Tour, Paulson finished 1999 as the Player of the Year with two wins. Paulson’s career came to an untimely end when he herniated three discs in his lower back and spent four years in and out of surgeries and rehab.

After the 2012 season, he made the difficult decision to retire from golf. Since then, Paulson has covered the sport of golf with the PGA Tour Radio’s Live coverage, PGA Tour Entertainment and Sirius XM PGA Tour Radio. He now has his own radio show with Dennis Paulson, “Inside the Ropes”, broadcasting live three times a week and covering all topics related to golf.

Dennis Paulson

Dennis Paulson

Dennis Paulson, started playing golf when he was 11 years old. He won his first tournament at the age of 13 and four years later he won the 1980 Southern California Junior Golf Player of the Year title. In college, Paulson was named Honorable Mention All-American and won the 1985 NCAA National Long Drive Championship. MORE 

After winning the National Long Drive Championship, Paulson immediately entered the world of professional golf. He won a Tour Championship in 2000, before his career was cut short by injuries.

In 2008, Paulson’s new career in broadcasting began as an announcer for Sirius XM Radio. Paulson has worked with SiriusXM Radio, PGA TOUR Entertainment, and ESPN Radio. He currently has his own radio show with Carl Paulson, “Inside the Ropes”, broadcasting live three times a week.

Gaylord Perry

Gaylord Perry

Gaylord Perry spent 22 years in Major League Baseball and he certainly made quite an impression. Perry was the best pitcher in both the National and American Leagues, becoming the first pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues. He held the record for the most consecutive 15-win seasons since 1900 with 13 seasons (1966-1978); a record that held for over a decade. He debuted in 1962, had his breakout season in 1966 finishing 21-8, he pitched a no-hitter at Candlestick Park in 1968 and won his 300th game in 1982 at the age of 44. MORE 

Perry had an amazing arm, but his greatest skill might have been his ability to get inside his opponents’ heads. He had a reputation for doctoring balls and he mixed an outstanding repertoire with a spitball, real or imagined. Some speculated that it was not so much the spitball itself, as the threat of it which wreaked havoc on the batters who faced him.

Perry, a five-time All-Star and five-time 20-game winner, won 314 games and notched 3,534 strikeouts in his career. He was inducted into the MLB Hall of Fame in 1991 and was nominated as a finalist for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. In 2005, the San Francisco Giants retired his uniform number 36 and in 2011 they honored Perry with a 2010 World Series ring.

Perry has been credited with having the 10th best career of any right-handed starting pitcher and The Sporting News ranked Perry at number 97 on its list of “The 100 Greatest Baseball Players”.

Chad Pfeifer

Chad Pfeifer

Chad Pfeifer was a multi-sport high school athlete who continued his baseball career in college. Shortly after college, Pfeifer joined the United States Army as an infantry paratrooper and served with 4/25 3/509th stationed at Ft. Richardson, Alaska. His unit was sent to Iraq in October of 2006 during Operation Iraqi Freedom and on April 12, 2007 Pfeifer’s truck was hit with a pressure plate IED that resulted in the amputation of his left leg above his knee. He spent the next year at Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) at Ft. Sam Houston in San Antonio, TX doing rehab and physical therapy learning how to walk with a prosthetic leg. While at BAMC, Pfeifer picked up the game of golf as a form of therapy and fell in love with it, hitting golf balls every afternoon and playing the course as much as he could. MORE 

After leaving BAMC and medically retiring from the Army in July of 2008, Pfeifer’s love of golf led him to pursue a career in golf. He attended the Golf Academy of America and in 2011, graduated at the top of his class.

In 2011 he won the National Amputee Championship hosted at Rio Verde Golf Club and the Inaugural Warrior Open, an event hosted by former President George W. Bush. Pfeifer successfully defended his title in 2012 and 2013 of the Warrior Open and recorded a hole in one on the 4th hole in front of former President George W. Bush in 2012. He also competed in the 2014 American Century Golf Championship and finished in 5th place.

Scott Phillips

Scott Phillips

Scott Phillips is the drummer and co-founder of the bands Creed, Alter Bridge, and Projected.

Phillips always wanted to play the drums, and at the age of 18, he taught himself how to play drums by spending countless hours watching his favorite drummers on MTV and recreating their moves.

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In late 2003, former Creed songwriter and guitarist, Mark Tremonti, decided to join forces with Phillips; original Creed bassist, Brian Marshall; and former Mayfield Four singer/songwriter, Myles Kennedy. The new band, Alter Bridge, released their debut album and launched their world tour in the summer of 2004.

In early 2012, Phillips joined the supergroup Projected with musicians from Sevendust and Submersed.

A.J. Pierzynski

A.J. Pierzynski

A. J. Pierzynski is currently a Major League Baseball (MLB) Catcher for the Boston Red Sox and has previously played for the Minnesota Twins (1998–2003), San Francisco Giants (2004), Chicago White Sox (2005–2012) and Texas Rangers (2013). MORE 

Pierzynski was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the third round (71st overall) immediately after graduating high school. After four years in the Twins organization, he was called up to the Majors and made MLB debut on September 9, 1998, when he was just 21 years old.

In 2002 he made the American League All-Star Team as a reserve catcher. In the 2002 American League Division Series, Pierzynski hit a clutch home run in the ninth inning of the final game, clinching the series for the Twins.

In 2003, Pierzynski obtained a career high .312 batting average and in 2006, he was named one of five American League players in the All-Star Final Vote. Pierzynski received 3.6 million votes, the most votes in the American League, subsequently sending him to his second All-Star appearance.

Dan Plesac

Dan Plesac

Dan Plesac, a threetime American League All-Star and 18-year Major League veteran, is an MLB Network analyst, regularly appearing on MLB Tonight and Hot Stove. An MLB Pitcher, Plesac played for the Milwaukee Brewers, Toronto Blue Jays, Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Arizona Diamondbacks, and Philadelphia Phillies. Plesac was a lefty pitcher known for a mid-90 mph fast ball and a deadly slider. MORE 

Plesac holds a 3.64 lifetime ERA with 158 career saves, his 1,064 games pitched ranks sixth in baseball history, and he remains Milwaukee’s all-time leader in games pitched (365), saves (133) and ERA (3.21; min. 500 IP).

Plesac was a member of the 1999 National League West Champion Diamondbacks and was the last Phillies pitcher to pitch at Veterans Stadium in 2003.

D.A. Points

D.A. Points

PGA Tour player, D.A. Points, became a professional golfer in 1999, after winning his third Illinois State Amateur Championship. Points played on the Buy.com (later Nationwide) Tour from 2001 to 2004 and won three events: the 2001 BUY.COM Inland Empire Open, the 2004 Northeast Pennsylvania Classic and the 2004 Pete Dye West Virginia Classic. MORE 

He earned his PGA Tour card by finishing second on the Nationwide Tour money list in 2004. He played on the PGA Tour in 2005 and 2006, but dropped back to the Nationwide Tour for 2007 and 2008. At the Miccosukee Championship in 2008, he holed his second shot from the fairway on the last hole on Sunday with a wedge and ended up winning in a playoff for his fourth career win. He finished 16th on the money list to earn his PGA Tour card for 2009.

Points had his first successful year on the PGA Tour in 2009, recording four top-10 finishes.

In 2011, Points won his first PGA Tour title at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, also winning the pro-am portion with amateur partner, actor Bill Murray. The victory helped him finish 37th on the money list, his best career finish to date. Points won his second title on the PGA Tour in 2013 at the Shell Houston Open, sinking a 13- foot (4 m) putt on the 72nd hole to save par and win by a stroke.

Points participates in charity work with the Children’s Miracle Network, which he became involved with because of his nephew, Carson Chorney, who is a cancer survivor and spokesperson for the Children’s Miracle Network.

Kenny Rogers

Kenny Rogers

In over 135 years of Major League Baseball history, there have been only 23 official perfect games recorded. a lefty pitcher in the league for 20 years, made history in 1994 when he pitched a perfect game. In nine innings, no opposing player reached a base. MORE 

Rogers was a true powerhouse on the mound, amassing scoreless inning after scoreless inning and becoming equally as known for his fielding ability, winning five Gold Glove Awards and being honored as the top fielding pitcher in major league baseball in 2008.

After injuries shortened his 2007 and 2008 seasons, Rogers ceased playing at the end of 2008, with 219 career victories. In 2011 Rogers was enshrined into the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame.

Mark Rypien

Mark Rypien

Canadian-born Mark Rypien played football for Washington State University, establishing himself as the number two All-Time Passing and Total Offense Leader. He also earned All-American honors in 1984 and 1985 and was named the Top Quarterback in the Pac-10 Conference in 1985. His collegiate career ended with Rypien throwing two fourth quarter touchdown passes just 49 seconds apart to lead his Senior Bowl team to victory. MORE 

Rypien was selected by the Washington Redskins in the sixth round of the 1986 National Football League draft. He then led the Redskins to the 1991 NFL championship and earned MVP honors in the 1992 Super Bowl. Rypien was twice selected to play in the NFL Pro Bowl.

Rypien’s off-field life brought some dramatic twists when sadly, he lost his son Andrew to cancer. As he and his family walked through this nightmare, they determined to turn this trial into a legacy for their son and to help other families devastated by illness.

In 2004, the Rypien Foundation was established with the intent to provide hope and help to families who are fighting childhood cancer. The funds raised by the Rypien Foundation go directly to support local programs that improve the quality of care and quality of life for families fighting childhood cancer in the Inland Northwest.

John Smoltz

John Smoltz

John Smoltz, an eight-time National League All-Star and the 1996 National League Cy Young Award winner, is currently an MLB Network game and studio analyst.

Smoltz, a key member of the 1995 World Champion Braves, is the only pitcher in MLB history to record at least 200 wins and 150 saves. He spent the first 20 years of his 21-year career with Atlanta before finishing with the Red Sox and Cardinals in 2009. MORE 

Smoltz is known as one of the greatest postseason pitchers in MLB history with a lifetime record of 15-4 and 2.67 ERA. Smoltz holds a career 2.47 ERA in eight World Series games pitched, including 52 strikeouts in 51 innings. Smoltz has the most strikeouts in postseason history (199), the second most postseason wins (15), and is the winner of the 1992 NLCS MVP award. His classic duel against the Twins’ Jack Morris in Game Seven of the 1991 World Series was ranked as second greatest game of the last 50 years in MLB Network’s 2011 series, MLB’s 20 Greatest Games.

Smoltz is the recipient of the 2005 Lou Gehrig Memorial Award, the 2005 Roberto Clemente Award and the 2007 Branch Rickey Award. The Atlanta Braves retired Smoltz’s jersey, No. 29, in June 2012.

John is currently a game and studio analyst for the MLB Network and serves as a color commentator for TBS during the regular season and Postseason.

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Michael Stewart

Michael Stewart

Michael Stewart is a retired National Basketball Association player who last played for the Atlanta Hawks. MORE 

Stewart, son of former Santa Clara standout and European pro Mike Stewart, played four seasons at the University of California, Berkeley. He averaged 4.3 points per game and 4.7 rebounds per game in 117 games and finished as the Bears’ all-time leading shot-blocker, with 207. Stewart set a school record by blocking 59 shots as a freshman and holds the four best singleseason totals for blocks in school history. He never missed a game, playing in all 117 games during his collegiate career and shooting .510 from the field.

Stewart began his NBA career with the Sacramento Kings in 1997. In his first year, he led the Kings in blocked shots and ranked second overall among NBA rookies.

Mark Sweeney

Mark Sweeney

AimPoint founder, Mark Sweeney, was named one of golf’s Top Innovators by Golf Digest Magazine, and was called “the best kept secret in golf” by the Golf Channel. Sweeney teaches a new, highly-effective green-reading method to professional, amateur and junior golfers. MORE 

Sweeney developed the Emmy-winning and patented technology, which can accurately predict optimum putting parameters and putt trajectories from any point on a green to any other point. This technology has been used regularly on the Golf Channel since 2007 and won the George Wensel Award for Technical Achievement at the 2007 Sports Emmy Awards.

AimPoint Technologies also consults top golf courses and architects on green rebuilds and renovations. Sweeney’s system is changing the way players of all skill levels learn to read greens.

Mark Tremonti

Mark Tremonti

Grammy Award-winning guitarist, Mark Tremonti, has a playing style that is instantly recognizable. He is known for his riffs in the multi-platinum rock band, Creed and his fretwork with the critically-acclaimed band, Alter Bridge. MORE 

As a founding member of both the bands, Creed and Alter Bridge, as well as collaborating with other artists and a successful solo career, Tremonti has sold over 40 million records worldwide.

Tremonti, in collaboration with Creed co-founder, Scott Stapp, have been collectively recognized as one of the most prolific songwriting teams in all of rock music; receiving a number of accolades, including one Grammy Award for Creed’s single “With Arms Wide Open.” Tremonti was named “Guitarist of the Year” for three consecutive years by Guitar World, and in 2011 he was listed in Total Guitar magazine as the fourth greatest heavy metal guitarist of all time.

In 2008, Tremonti and his brother formed FRET12, an online musicians’ community, production company and record label, to release his 2008 instructional guitar documentary DVD titled Mark Tremonti: The Sound & the Story, wherein he teaches all of his guitar solos from Alter Bridge’s sophomore release, Blackbird. He also teaches warm-ups, alternate tunings, fingerpicking- style, legato techniques, and other advanced exercises.

Frank Viola

Frank Viola

Frank Viola is a former starting lefty Pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Minnesota Twins (1982– 1989), New York Mets (1989–91), Boston Red Sox (1992–1994), Cincinnati Reds (1995) and Toronto Blue Jays (1996). A threetime All-Star, he was named World Series MVP with the Twins in 1987 and won the American League Cy Young Award in 1988. MORE 

Viola’s overall career stats are impressive, with a 3.73 ERA, 176-150 record, 74 complete games pitched and 16 shutouts in 421 games.

He was nicknamed “Sweet Music”, by a Minnesota sports writer who declared that when Viola pitched, there was “Sweet Music” in the Dome. A fan began displaying a banner bearing the phrase in the outfield’s upper deck whenever Viola pitched and Twins’ fans considered the banner to be a good luck charm.

Viola was inducted into the Twins’ Hall of Fame and was honored as a member of the Twins’ “All-Dome” team in 2009.

Tim Wakefield

Tim Wakefield

Tim Wakefield is most remembered for his 17-year tenure with the Boston Red Sox. Wakefield was the longest-serving player on the Sox team and at the time of his retirement in 2012, he was the oldest current active player in the major leagues. MORE 

Wakefield was initially drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates as a first-baseman, but in an effort to move up to the majors, he began developing his infamous knuckleball and a year later made his professional pitching debut. He was able to work his way up to the majors and in his first season, he earned the title of National League Rookie Pitcher of the Year.

Wakefield’s career was filled with many more awards, including the American League Comeback Player of the Year in 1995 and eight nominations for the Roberto Clemente Award, winning the award in 2010.

Chris Young

Chris Young

Chris Young always wanted to be a musician, “I knew without a shadow of a doubt that music is what drives me and it was what I had to do.” So, right out of high school, he devoted himself to that dream; and his focus has paid off. MORE 

Young landed a record deal and debut on RCA. His self-titled album would go on to earn him the title of Best-Selling New Country Male Vocalist for 2006 and a nod for the Academy of Country Music’s Top New Male Vocalist award.

Young doubled-down on the success of his first record with the release of his second CD, The Man I Want To Be. Any concern over maintaining momentum vanished when the album powered right through the dreaded sophomore slump with three back-to-back #1 singles. The impressive streak started with “Gettin’ You Home” and picked up steam with the release of the title track, “The Man I Want To Be”.

His third studio album, NEON, debuted at #4 on the all-genre Billboard Top 200 chart and produced two chart-topping singles, “Tomorrow” and “You”. “Tomorrow” has already exceeded 1 million downloads, becoming certified Platinum by the RIAA.

Young’s all-around accomplishments as an entertainer also earned him one of the industry’s highest honors: his first-ever Grammy nomination for Best Male Country Vocal Performance for “Gettin’ You Home.” In addition, Young joins an elite group of superstars as he earned a nomination in the Male Vocalist of the Year and Single Record of the Year categories for the 47th Annual Academy of Country Music Awards in 2012.